Morgan Spurlock on the Comic Con documentary


This is an excerpt from an interview with Morgan Spurlock on Bullz-Eye.com. At the end of the interview, Spurlock comments about his upcoming documentary on Comic Con called Episode IV: A Fan’s Hope.

By Bob Westal on 10/06/2010

BE: [Laughing] Okay, switching gears a little bit, first of all, what’s going on with the Comic-Con film?

MS: We’re editing it as we speak. We’re plowing through that. We shot 600 hours of footage for that movie in, literally, six days. It was the largest crew I’d ever worked with in my life. We had about 175 people working on the movie. Massive. We’re just sifting through, putting storylines together. It was cool because we followed ten different people with very different stories and goals when they were coming into Comic-Con. What’s it going to show people is something very different, I think, than what they think Comic-Con is. People think Comic-Con’s the place where crazy people go dressed up in costume and hang out and party. That’s a piece of it, but there’s so much more that goes on.

BE: Can you give us a hint of that? I’ve been going to Comic-Con since way… I don’t even want to tell you how far back I go with that.

MS: I think Comic-Con actually has real cultural significance, for one. I think people do somewhat realize that, but I don’t think with the impact and breadth of what it does and what it means. But it also has personal impact. It literally impacts individuals who go there in ways that I think are interesting.

BE: Now, there’s been a lot of criticism. A lot of people like myself and people older than me are not pleased with the direction it’s gone in.

“I grew up reading comic books. When I met Stan Lee, it was one of the greatest highlights of my life, getting to meet him. And then getting to work with him on this movie was awesome. Like when I was a kid and Michael Ironside made that guy’s head blow up in the movie “Scanners.” That’s what made me want to make movies.”

MS: There’s an interview I did, I’m trying to remember who it was, I don’t want to give credit to the wrong person… but it was one of the people who comes from the genre world, the comic book world, who said: “Glee,” why is “Glee” here? What business does “Glee” have being at Comic-Con? That’s a very valid point. But “The Walking Dead,” you know the new Frank Darabont series on AMC, that makes total sense to be there. So, I think that there’s a ton of people who’ve tried to ride the coattails of Comic-Con for all the wrong reasons, but I think there’s plenty of genre pieces that, while television has grown and film has grown, that have come and been a part of it. People think that it’s been taken over by Hollywood, and I don’t think that’s true. I think you’ve seen less people selling comics over the years automatically, and less comic book stores, and so there are less people there as vendors. I think the film side of this is helping to continue to drive a fan base. So, for me, I don’t have a big problem with that. I’m not so precious about it. There are people who are very precious about it, and I’m not.

BE: Okay. Do you consider yourself a fan?

MS: Oh, I’m such a geek. Such a fan. I grew up reading comic books. When I met Stan Lee, it was one of the greatest highlights of my life, getting to meet him. And then getting to work with him on this movie was awesome. Like when I was a kid and Michael Ironside made that guy’s head blow up in the movie “Scanners.” That’s what made me want to make movies.

BE: [Laughing.]

MS:  I said, that’s it, I want to do this. So I started out trying to learn how to do make-up special effects. And those were the things I grew up reading – comics and Fangoriamagazine. That was my life. I was the weird kid who didn’t have a girlfriend.

BE: And, of course, you end up as a filmmaker.

MS: That’s right.

Spurlock has recently tweeted that a trailer should be released by Spring time.
To read the entire article, go to Bullz-Eye.

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